Love for Mexico

The Meaning of Cinco de Mayo in Mexico and the US May 02 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler

In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is largely seen as an excuse to get together with friends and feast on tacos, guacamole, and margaritas, even though only 1 in 10 Americans know what Cinco de Mayo is actually about.

Photo by Heather Ford on Unsplash

The Significance of Cinco de Mayo

Of course, anyone with connections to Mexico knows that Cinco de Mayo isn’t the Mexican equivalent of the Fourth of July – it’s not even a Mexican national holiday – and that it’s actually a celebration of the Mexican victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla on 5 May, 1862, that represents the capacity of the Mexican people to come together to defeat what was considered at the time the world’s most powerful army.

Cinco de Mayo is celebrated in the city of Puebla with a huge parade along with battle reenactments, followed by music, dancing, and food. There’s also the Festival International 5 de Mayo, which lasts from 26 April through 12 May and features over 900 artists from nine different countries at 35 venues.

But why is Cinco de Mayo, which isn’t really commemorated much in Mexico except in Puebla, celebrated in the United States at all?

The Cinco de Mayo – U.S. Civil War Connection

Did you know that the first Cinco de Mayo celebrations in the States occurred in 1862, when Mexicans and other Latin Americans who had gone to California during the Gold Rush of 1849 were showing their support for the Union during the U.S. Civil War?

When Latin American countries won their independence from Spain, the new nations abolished slavery and provided citizenship to all people, regardless of race or social standing. So naturally, the Mexicans in California and elsewhere in the West were on the side of the Union in opposition to slavery during the U.S. Civil War. Plus, as people of color, many saw the prospect of a Confederate victory as a personal threat.

When news reports about the scrappy Mexicans’ defeat of the mighty French military reached them, they joined together in juntas patrióticas to not only celebrate the unlikely victory at Puebla but to also mobilize in support the Union war effort while denouncing the Confederacy, which was being supported by French Emperor Napoleon III.

Celebrating Cinco de Mayo in Gringolandia

Although the original reason has become obscured by history, the tradition of celebrating Cinco de Mayo in Los Angeles has continued without interruption ever since 1862. And today, there are major festivals celebrating Mexican culture in many U.S. cities. These are some of the biggest ones:

So regardless of which side of the Rio Grande you’re on, there’s reason to celebrate the triumph of the little guy over the big and powerful, the vanquishing of slavery, and the vibrant food, dance, and musical traditions of Mexico – all at the same time. ¡Viva Cinco de Mayo!

Cinco de Mayo celebration in Saint Paul, Minnesota
JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

Commemorating the Struggle for Workers' Rights in Mexico April 29 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler

Día del Trabajo on 1 May is the day when workers in Mexico and many other place°s around the world celebrate the rights of workers and the struggle to gain rights and protections that began in the second half of the 19th century and continues today.

How May Day Became International Day of the Worker

Soon after the U.S. Civil War ended in 1865, unionized workers in industrial centers such as Baltimore and New York began fighting for the eight-hour workday. And in 1884, a resolution was introduced at the annual convention of the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions of the United States and Canada, forever connecting the day of 1 May with the labor movement:

“Resolved ... that eight hours shall constitute a legal day’s labor from and after May 1, 1886, and that we recommend to labor organizations throughout this district that they so direct their laws so as to conform to this resolution by the time named.”


On the designated date, workers across the nation began a general strike that was accompanied by rallies in support of the eight-hour workday. But events at Haymarket Square, in Chicago, took a violent turn when clashes between security forces and civilians left many dead. However, despite an anti-union clampdown and the kangaroo-court trial of suspected radicals, the labor movement in the United States grew and strengthened.

In July 1889, at the International Socialist Congress’ founding meeting of the Second International in Paris, May Day was officially designated as International Workers’ Day in commemoration of the Haymarket affair. The first of May became a day dedicated to the struggle for the eight-hour workday as well as for other workers’ rights, such as safe working conditions, workers’ compensation, and putting an end to child labor.

Today, workers’ rights are celebrated in many countries on 1 May, including all of Latin America, but not in the United States, which has Labor Day on the first Monday in September every year.

Día del Trabajo in Mexico

Mexico’s first workers’ parade was held on 1 May, 1913, with more than 25,000 workers taking to the streets. Today, 1 May is a federal holiday. Parades, rallies, and demonstrations take place throughout the country, often drawing large crowds.

La Huelga de Cananea


In addition to showing solidarity with workers demanding their rights across the globe and celebrating the hard-won workers’ rights and protections now instituted into Mexican law, Día del Trabajo in Mexico also commemorates la Huelga de Cananea of 1906. When the Mexican workers employed in the Cananea, Sonora, copper mines went on strike and rallied to protest deplorable conditions and being paid less than workers who were U.S. citizens, chaos broke out, as the miners from each country fought each other and both Mexican and U.S. troops were brought in to quell the tumult. The event is memorialized in the corrido La cárcel de Cananea.

JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

¡Viva la revolución de cine México! April 24 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

There was a Golden Age of Mexican Cinema that lasted from the 1930s through the early 1960s, after which Hollywood dominated the movie scene in Mexico. But now there’s a new wave of energy and creativity that’s putting Mexico at the top of the cinematic world: Here comes the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema 2.0!
The Golden Age of Mexican Cinema

The original Golden Age of Mexican Cinema brought us such national treasures as Fernando de Fuentes’ Vámonos con Pancho Villa, Luis Buñuel’s Los olvidados, Alberto Gout’s Aventurera, and of course Enamorada and María Candelaria, both by Emilio Fernándes, along with many films featuring Cantinflas.

Cantinflas

Cantinflas
Photo by peru21.pe, CC BY-SA 4.0

But then came television, along with new technical innovations in the film industry that increased the cost of production, making it difficult for the Mexican film industry to compete with Hollywood. Mexican audiences were left with low-budget B-movie luchador cult classics, silly sexicomedias, and direct-to-video “Mexploitation” flicks, while serious films were largely relegated to the international film festival and arthouse scenes.

The Birth of Nuevo Cine México

Thankfully, during the 1990s, a cinematic renaissance began to blossom in Mexico, beginning with the success of Alfonso Arau’s Como Agua Para Chocolate. Soon, the Mexican directors known as the “Three Amigos” — Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Alfonso Cuarón, and Guillermo del Toro — emerged into the international spotlight with the breakout films Amores Perros, Y Tu Mamá También, and Cronos.

Alejandro G. Iñarritu
Alejandro G. Iñárritu
Photo by Georges Biard, CC BY-SA 3.0

Mexican Cinema’s Second Golden Age

By the 2010s, the Nuevo Cine México movement was showing all the signs of a Golden Age of being Mexican Cinema 2.0, as the Three Amigos moved beyond Mexican audiences and on to producing highly acclaimed English-language films.

Meanwhile, back home in Mexico, experienced directors such as Carlos Carrera (El crimen del Padre Amaro), along with a fresh crop of filmmakers, began receiving the support they needed to dramatically increase the production of films for the domestic market. Mexico went from producing 28 films in 2000 to 130 films in 2014. And in 2018, the number of Mexican films rose to 184.

This stunning increase in volume has given space to a dynamic filmmaking industry in Mexico. Carlos Reygadas and Amat Escalante are leading the way in the art film genre, having won Cannes Film Festival awards for Best Director for Post Tenebras Luz and Heli.

Actors Diego Luna and Gael García Bernal have helped support Mexican independent film with the establishment of their production company Canana in 2005. Annual film festivals in Guadalajara, Morelia, and other spots are also advancing the cause by cultivating and showcasing emerging new artists.

 

JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

Culture Shock: Coping with Cultural Transition April 16 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

It’s a shock to exactly nobody that Mexico and the United States have very different cultures. Yet culture shock still happens, particularly when people from the States come to Mexico for the first time and vice versa. But it’s not limited to first-time visitors, and in fact, it can even occur when you return to your home country after being away for a while. So let’s take a look at what this all means for people whose lives are intertwined with the cultures of both Mexico and the United States.

Photo by Ivan Cervantes on Unsplash

What Is Culture Shock?

Culture shock is usually defined in terms of disorientation when experiencing an environment that is unfamiliar, and it’s most commonly associated with travel or moving to another country. But if you look at culture shock as a subset of the general phenomenon of “transition shock,” I think it puts things into perspective and can help you cope with the normal human reactions to change.

Change always requires adjustment, and the process of adjusting can involve all kinds of emotional ups and downs that go along with a sense of loss of control. But in the end, it’s all part of a process of personal growth that can enhance adaptability, resiliency, empathy, and many other life skills that will make you a stronger person.

Photo by Paula May on Unsplash

Four Stages of Culture Shock

How each individual reacts to cultural change varies greatly. However, there are basically four stages of culture shock, which don’t necessarily play out for everyone or occur progressively.

  1. Honeymoon. This is the infatuation stage. You’re curious, enthusiastic about engaging with your new environment, and in love with everything about it.
  2. Frustration. This is the hard part. Your idealized view of the culture is chipped away by the reality that you can’t get a handle on how things work, you’re having trouble adjusting to the daily rhythms, communicating is a constant challenge, underlying problems are becoming visible, you’re starting to get annoyed by things that seemed quaint at first, you miss people and things from home, etc.
  3. Adjustment. Eventually, you begin to get more used to your surroundings and start feeling more comfortable.
  4. Adaptation. You’re settling in, getting familiar with the routines, maybe even feeling a sense of belonging.

Reverse Culture Shock

When you leave your comfort zone to experience a different culture, it changes you, so don’t expect that you will feel the same about your home culture when you return. At the same time, don’t expect those who remained there to identify with the new you. All this can lead to reverse culture shock, when you feel out of place and disoriented all over again.

 

JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

Popocatépetl in the Land of Fire and Passion April 08 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

For the 21 million people living in the shadow of Popocatépetl, having a sense of the power behind the forces that shape the natural world around us is a daily occurrence. This active stratovolcano has been rumbling and sending plumes of ash high into the sky since its birth, which was probably about 730,000 years ago. Although there was a period of quiet that began in 1947, the volcano whose name means “smoking mountain” in Nahuatl began its smoking again in 1994.

Popocatepetl

Public Domain

Now, el Popo has begun erupting forcefully, sending plumes of ash and gas several kilometers high and showering hails of fire down its slopes over the past couple of weeks. This spectacular volcanic activity has gained international attention, prompted CENAPRED to up the alert level to Yellow Phase 3, and ignited interest in this iconic, beating heart of Mexico.

A Land of Fire and Passion

Did you know that Popocatépetl is the second-highest volcano in North America, rising to some 5,452 meters above sea level? Of course, the highest one is also Mexican: Pico de Orizaba, or Citlaltépetl, as it’s known in Nahuatl, at 5,636 meters.

By David Tuggy, CC BY-SA 2.5

Both Orizaba and Popocatépetl are stratovolcanoes, which means they are made up of layers of solidified lava and volcanic ash built up by multiple eruptions. But while Orizaba is dormant, el Popo is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico, along with Volcán de Colima.

These volcanoes and many others form the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which arcs across the continent from the Pacific to the Atlantic coasts. In fact, here you can see six Mexican volcanoes in the belt: from left to right, there’s Iztaccíhuatl, Popocatépetl, Matlalcueitl (Malinche), and Cofre de Perote, with Pico de Orizaba rising up in the distance and Sierra Negra visible behind it.

Popocatépetl is connected to Mexico’s third-highest volcano, Iztaccíhuatl, by a saddle known as Paso de Cortés, which is the mountain pass that conquistador Hernán Cortés crossed over to arrive at Tenochtitlán in 1519. Today, this is where you gain access to enter Parque Nacional Iztaccíhuatl-Popocatépetl.

Iztaccíhuatl, which means “white woman” in Nahuatl, is also referred to as Mujer dormida because the contours resemble the profile of a woman lying on her back. Together, Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl represent the power of Mexico’s impressive volcanic landscape to express the passion and intensity of Mexican culture.

The Legend of Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl

While there are different versions of the legend of the star-crossed lovers who became entombed in the landscape, the Mexican writer and journalist Carlos Villa Roiz tells it basically this way:

Long ago in Tenochtitlán, there was a beautiful princess named Mixtli. The daughter of Tizoc, the emperor of the Mexicas, Mixtli was pursued by many men, but her heart belonged to the hansom warrior Popoca. To win the hand of the princess, Popoca was sent to prove his mettle on the battlefield, so he went off to combat strengthened by the knowledge that his beloved was awaiting his return. But Mixtli was tortured by visions that Popoca had been killed in battle and became so dejected that she perished.

Eventually, to everyone’s surprise, Popoca returned triumphant. Upon learning of the death of his one true love, he carried her body to the tops of the surrounding mountains, where she would become Iztaccíhuatl. And he, too, remains there, kneeling at her feet and watching over her eternal sleep, torch in hand, trembling and fuming with passion, until the end of time.

 

JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

 


The Michelada: Turning the Ordinary into the Extraordinary March 31 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

When it comes to alcoholic beverages, beer is the most popular on a global scale. And when it comes to all beverages, it ranks #3, behind water and tea. So it should come as no surprise that cerveza is a favorite here in Mexico, too. But of course, when you add in the flavors of Mexico, a regular chela is raised to a whole new level of wonderful: behold the magnificent michelada!

Michelada
By Flickr user Scott Dexter, CC BY-SA 2.0

Micheladas: Beating the Heat and the Hair of the Dog

Nothing beats a cold, salty, spicy, citrus-y michelada served in a frosted mug to cut through the sweltering Mexican midday heat. Whether you’re in a graceful patio in the heart of the city, on a hacienda porche in the countryside, or languishing in a lawn chair at the beach, this cerveza preparada is the perfect cocktail because it’s tangy, bubbly, and oh so refreshing – and you’re not even expected to wait until the cocktail hour to drink it! Oh, and it’s great for hangovers, too.

Michelada, or Just Chelada?

According to Spanish Wikipedia, the simplest michelada recipe starts with a frosted a beer mug or glass, then you moisten the lip with lime juice and salt it, squeeze more lime juice into the glass, and fill the rest with your favorite cerveza. But this formula isn’t considered a true michelada by most Mexicans, who would argue that it’s just a regular old chelada if it doesn’t include savory or spicy sauce – or isn’t rimmed with tajín.

By Popo le Chien, CC BY-SA 3.0

The Best Micheladas

The best micheladas have multiple types of salsa in them: salsa inglesa, salsa soya, salsa Maggi, and salsa picante, maybe even several different kinds of hot sauce. Plus, there might also be black pepper, cayenne pepper, and/or some other type of peppers. Of course, there must be lime juice, but you can also add orange or another type of fruit juice too, if you like. There’s no need to be shy with the tajín. And few slices of cucumber thrown in are always a nice addition. As for ice cubes, well, some would consider that a cerveza gringa. In my humble opinion, if you start with a frosty mug and an ice-cold beer in the first place, you’re good to go.


By Will Shenton, CC BY-SA 3.0

Other Cervezas Preparadas

As with chelada, there are other types of cervezas preparadas that often get lumped in with micheladas. Here are a couple of them:

Chavela drinks can have the same ingredients as a michelada – or not – but they will always include something tomato-y, such as tomato juice, V8, Camaronazo, or Clamato (this the tomato and clam juice one is also poetically called an Ojo Rojo). They’re usually served on the rocks with a carrot or celery stick, which makes them pretty much Mexican Bloody Marys. Another popular garnish for them is shrimp.


By Martintoy, CC BY-SA 3.0

The Negro y Marron combines beer, Clamato, lime juice, and tequila, with a salt rim and salsa piquante to taste.

Chamochela drinks are for those who like their spicy with a touch of sweetness. For this cocktail, you have your beer, your lime juice, and your tajín, plus chamoy, often with a garnish of candied tamarind.

From Ordinary to Extraordinary

While what makes a michedada a michelada may be up for debate, what’s clear is that all these delicious and refreshing cold beer cocktails really show off the way Mexican culture can turn something ordinary into something magnificent and extraordinary!

JULIE R BUTLER IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND EDITOR LIVING IN PÁTZCUARO, MICHOACÁN. SHE HAS 20-PLUS YEARS' EXPERIENCE EXPLORING MÉXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, ARGENTINA, AND URUGUAY. IN ADDITION TO WRITING ABOUT THE WONDERS OF LIVING IN MÉXICO, SHE SPECIALIZES NEW TECHNOLOGIES – PARTICULARLY, HYDROPONICS AND SMART-CITY TECH. ONLINE PORTFOLIO: HTTPS://JULIERBUTLER.CONTENTLY.COM/

The Resplendent Rebozo March 27 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

When I first came to Pátzcuaro, I was enchanted by the Purépecha women of the region and their traditional rebozos.


At the time, I would have never dreamed of wearing a rebozo myself, in part because I was told that each indigenous group had a specific rebozo design that identified them, kind of like how Scottish clans each have their distinctive kilt patterns, and I didn’t want to try to appropriate a garments with so much cultural significance.

As it turns out, the significance of the rebozo in Purépecha culture is even more than that:
De colores, bordados, deshilados o con plumas, el rebozo purépecha es más que una indumentaria para proteger a la mujer del frío, es un símbolo de su cultura, identidad, feminidad y estado civil que portan con orgullo y elegancia.
Of colors, embroidery, frayed or feathered, the Purépecha rebozo is more than just clothing to protect women from the cold, it is a symbol of their culture, identity, femininity and marital status that they carry with pride and elegance.

Once I started paying more attention, I realized that younger females wear flashier colored rebozos, while the older women wrap themselves in more discrete tones. And indeed, the custom is for married women to wear conservative colors, while older women must wear dark hues. Additionally, Purépecha women are usually wrapped in a white rebozo when burried.

I love how rebozo designs and fabrics differ by region. For example, the rebozos from Oaxaca tend to be lighterweight than the ones from Michoacán. And then there are the famous Santa María del Río rebozos, which represent the styles from San Luis Potosí.

Beyond its cultural importance, I love the utility of this simple piece of cloth. The rebozo is not just useful as a head covering to protect against the sun or a shawl to wrap up in against the chill, but it can also be used to transport things and carry babies, in addition to making a fashion statement or classing up your look.

 


Here in the Pátzcuaro Lake region, I still see mothers carrying their babies on their backs, bundled cozily in these instant baby carriers. Mexican women have known of the benefits of keeping their children close to their bodies for centuries before babywearing became trendy in the industrialized world!


I’ve gotten over my reluctance toward wearing rebozos, after seeing more and more women wearing them and admiring how graceful and chic they can be. Frida Kahlo loved to wear rebozos, and now I do too. I have a few of them, and in fact, I don’t think it’s possible to have too many of them!

Julie R Butler is a freelance writer and editor living in Pátzcuaro, Michoacán. She has 20-plus years' experience exploring México, Central America, Argentina, and Uruguay. In addition to writing about the wonders of living in México, she specializes new technologies – particularly, hydroponics and smart-city tech. Online portfolio: https://julierbutler.contently.com/

Culture, Beaches, Nature, Sports - Mexico Has Something for Everyone March 20 2019, 0 Comments

By Julie R Butler 

Shoptezuma is all about how great Mexico is; and one of my favorite things about Mexico is the access to parks, beaches, and awesome natural splendor as well as vibrant urban centers, a hoppin’ sports scene, and all kinds of intriguing historical and artistic cultural treasures.

Multilayered Mexican Culture

I love that the cultural atmosphere throughout Mexico has many layers, with a contiguous human history that reaches thousands of years back in time, the colonial influence, lots of different indigenous communities that continue to honor their traditions, and the various regional customs, foods, and music – all coexisting with the vibrancy of modern-day Mexican life.

Mexico City

Photo by Obed Hernández on Unsplash

Mexico’s Rich Heritage

Consider this: The United States is almost five times larger than Mexico in terms of land area, yet Mexico has 35 UNESCO World Heritage sites, while the United States only has 23. From pre-Hispanic archaeological sites to the many colonial city centers, from the tequila-producing region of Jalisco to the tropical forests of Campeche, from monarch butterflies in Michoacán to the whale sanctuary on the Baha Peninsula – these amazing sites showcase the diverse historic and natural heritage of Mexico.

In addition to these sites, UNESCO lists 10 Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity items from Mexico, including things like charrería, mariachi music, and traditional Mexican cuisine.

Mexico Pyramid

Photo by Filip Gielda on Unsplash

Mexico’s Biological and Geographic Diversity

When it comes to biodiversity by country, Mexico ranks 5th, while the United States ranks 12th.

An astounding amount of different types of plants and animals inhabit Mexico, and it’s because of the country’s unique geography: Mexico spreads from the desert north to tropical jungles of the south; the country is very mountainous, so the different altitudes add to the variety of climates and environments; and there are hundreds of kilometers of coastline along both sides that are lined with gorgeous beaches. All of this adds up to a wide variety of different natural settings to enjoy. And wherever you are, you’re never too far from a chillaxing beach vacation.

Mexico Turtle

Photo by Adolfo Félix on Unsplash

Mexico’s Vibrant Urban Centers

As for urban centers, there is no city in the world that’s more dynamic Mexico City. But if CDMX is a bit too much city for you, there are less hectic cities such as Guadalajara, Oaxaca, Morelia, Guanajuato, Monterrey, Puebla, and León, each with its own distinctive character, and all of which are still bursting at the seams with everything from restaurants, museums, theaters, and sports venues to buzzing business districts, intriguing historical centers, beautiful parks, and plenty of bustling shopping areas and markets to lose yourself in.

 Mexico Catedral

Photo by Jezael Melgoza on Unsplash

Mexico Chillax

When you need to escape all the hustle and bustle of urban life, there are plenty of options, ranging from parks and gardens in the heart of the city to over sixty national parks spread across the country to the fabulous Yucatan and Pacific Coast and beaches. These are some of the standouts:

Parks:

  • Bosque de Chapultepec, CDMX
  • Sumidero Canyon National Park, Chiapas
  • Arrecifes de Cozumel National Park, Quintana Roo
  • Palenque National Park, Chiapas

Beaches:

  • Tulum
  • Puerto Vallarta
  • Los Cabos
  • Playa del Carmen
  • Cancun

Mexico Beach

Photo by Sébastien Jermer on Unsplash

The Mexican Passionate for Sports

Another thing I really love about Mexico is the passionate for sports. Of course, Mexican fútbol fans are renowned for their enthusiasm. But that’s not the only sport that has a fervent fan base in Mexico. Other international sports such as béisbol and boxeo are huge, as are uniquely Mexican popular sports like lucha libre and frontenis. And the traditional Mexican sports of toreo and charrería are also quite alive and well.

Something for Everyone

So whether you’re a beach bum, a city slicker, a nature lover, a culture buff, or a sports enthusiast, Mexico has something for everyone!

 

Julie R Butler is a freelance writer and editor living in Pátzcuaro, Michoacán. She has 20-plus years' experience exploring México, Central America, Argentina, and Uruguay. In addition to writing about the wonders of living in México, she specializes new technologies – particularly, hydroponics and smart-city tech. Online portfolio: https://julierbutler.contently.com/